A Cold Shift: Welcome to the World of Beer Slushies

Photo: Courtesy of Reve Brewing

Photo: Courtesy of Reve Brewing

The slushy machine has long lived at gas stations and convenience stores, doling out frosty concoctions that deliver both sugar rushes and brain freeze. Bars, too, slushify margaritas, daiquiris, rosé and more—the frozen drinks delivering good times on patios, backyards, and beaches alike.

Now, breweries are jumping into the slush. From Sweden’s Omnipollo to North Carolina’s Barrel Culture to Colorado’s Wiley Roots, breweries are creating colorful slushies that draw customers to taprooms, rounding out offerings for folks that might not be crazy for that hazy double IPA. “Our motto is, for you, for all,” says Hamlet Fort, the marketing and events manager for Denver’s Station 26 Brewing. “We want to make beers and create experiences for everyone.”

Heresy? Heaven? You make the call. My story awaits at October.

Aftermarket Effects: How Breweries and Companies Are Changing Beer's Flavor

Illustration: Ben Chaplek

Illustration: Ben Chaplek

For Good Beer Hunting, I tackled this little notion: What compels companies and breweries to tweak the flavor of finished beer? Whether for educational or taste-elevating purposes, breweries and companies are constantly inventing new techniques and tools to help consumers reshape and reimagine their beer. A pint doesn’t always sit at the finish line of flavor. In fact, sometimes, it’s perched on the starting blocks—ready to race in unexpected directions. Interested in reading more?

The Best Beer Can Design of 2019

So many pretty cans!

So many pretty cans!

Simply making great beer no longer guarantees success for American breweries. With more than 7,000 breweries in the country (a new one probably opened up just now), there’s more pressure than ever to differentiate in a thronged marketplace. To stand out in crowded fridges and coolers, breweries are creating striking design on cans, 360-degree posters that customers can carry in their hands—and kill it on Instagram. For Ceros, I took a deep look at the state of beer-can design and helped create this fun interactive guide.

The Inside Scoop on Why Sam Adams Bought Dogfish Head

Jim Koch (left) and Sam Calagione at Eataly in New York City.

Jim Koch (left) and Sam Calagione at Eataly in New York City.

In early May, news broke big and loud that Sam Adams bought Dogfish Head. The very next day after the announcement, I had the chance to chat with Jim Koch and Sam Calagione about why the sale went down. I turned the interviews into a rapid-fire article for Men’s Journal, making sense of the sale for one and all. Curious? Oh boy, do I have a link for you!

The Hottest New Hop Varieties of 2019

Photo courtesy of Crosby Hop Farm / Blake Crosby is a fifth-generation hop farmer and the CEO of Crosby Hop Farm.

Photo courtesy of Crosby Hop Farm / Blake Crosby is a fifth-generation hop farmer and the CEO of Crosby Hop Farm.

Each year, farmers in the Pacific Northwest and around the world release the latest and greatest hop varieties destined to change the very aroma and flavor and beer. From the dank, passion fruit punch of Strata to grape-like Zappa, I dive into the latest varieties looking to make a splash in 2019 and beyond. My story for SevenFifty Daily awaits.

Eight (Ounces) Is Enough: The Move to Mini Cans

Photo: Juren David
Photo: Juren David

I try to pay close attention to trends, both big ones and small ones like the push to eight-ounce cans of beers. They're the perfect size for imperial stouts and lagers destined to be sipped alongside a shot of whiskey. Here, I tackle the economics behind eight-ounce cans for SevenFifty Daily. 

Why Is Your Favorite Brewery Making Canned Cocktails?

Boulevard Brewing is behind the Fling brand of canned cocktails. 
Boulevard Brewing is behind the Fling brand of canned cocktails. 
These are mighty crowded moments in American craft beer. To separate themselves and keep bottom lines robust, brewers are turning to non-beer beverages. Here, I take a look at how breweries are using their talent pool and infrastructure to create canned cocktails that are as convenient as they are tasty. My October story awaits...

Breweries: A Potential Savior of Strip Malls?

Illustration: Adam Waito
Illustration: Adam Waito

I grew up suburbia, strip malls crisscrossing my existence. So when I moved to New York City a couple decades ago, I put strip malls far out of mind. Not everyone can. They're a fact of life for much of American life. Many strip malls have fallen on hard times, old models replaced by the new. For October, I take a look at the state of the modern strip mall and how breweries can serve as beacons to attract like-minded businesses, turning strip malls into destinations and not just a to-do on your shopping list.